Fort Worth Westerners

Corral, Westerners International

The Corral meets the third Tuesday monthly (except Jun, Jul, Aug & Dec) at
Ol' South Pancake House
1509 S University Drive
Fort Worth, TX 76107

6 pm Social Time / Dinner
(order from restaurant menu)
7 pm Program
Topics include local, Texas, and Western history.
Speakers are members, local historians, and university professors.
Visitors are welcome.

Corral annual membership dues of $20/single and $30/couple are based on the calendar year and include the annual dues payable to our parent organization, Westerners International. Checks are payable to Fort Worth Westerners Corral.

The Fort Worth Westerners Corral was founded in 1965 and is the oldest of the eight active Corrals in Texas. Like the Westerners International organization, membership is open to anyone interested in Western history.

Bob Saul
Fort Worth Westerners' Sheriff
(does what a president does)

Phillip Williams
Fort Worth Westerners' Representative
(works as the representative for contacts with other Corrals, Posses, and the Home Ranch.)


Nov. 19, 2019
Dawn Youngblood

Nov. 19, 2019: Dawn Youngblood, "Images of America: Fort Worth"

"Images of America: Fort Worth"

Fort Worth exudes a vivacious Western spirit founded upon a rich history. In 1849, four years after the Republic of Texas became the 28th state, the Army built a fort to keep native tribes west of the Trinity. That fort grew into a focal stop on the Chisholm Trail and later became the western terminus of the railroad. In World War I, Fort Worth housed one Army and three aircraft training bases, while Fort Worth Stockyards, which became one of the largest in the nation, provided multitudes of horses and mules. From pianos on dirt floors to the Van Cliburn Competition, from the earliest portraits by itinerant French artists to world-class art museums, Fort Worth has always been home to high culture. Groups such as the Woman's Wednesday Club made sure art and libraries stood in the old fort town once more famous for its saloons. No matter the era, and no matter the many reasons, Fort Worth will always be "where the West begins."

Meet Dawn Youngblood

Dr. Dawn Youngblood is Director of Historic Preservation and Archives for Tarrant County in Fort Worth, Texas. The award-winning archives holds many treasures and secrets preserved from the old West past of the region. She is author of two books: The SMS Ranch and Images of America: Fort Worth, which will be available in the fall.

Dawn grew up in San Antonio, where she attended the Alamo Heights Schools and developed a passion for history. She obtained a degree in Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin, where she met and married her husband, Fort Worth attorney Edwin Johnston Youngblood. They have lived in Fort Worth since 1982 and have two grown children, Christian and Eden.

Following a career in publishing – having worked as a Senior Editor for Harcourt Brace, and Publications Director for Freese and Nichols – Dawn returned to graduate school. She obtained a PhD in Anthropology from Southern Methodist University in 2003 and worked full time at SMU as a curator and professor.

In 2010, Dawn began her current position as Tarrant County Archivist, and in 2017 became Tarrant County Historic Preservation and Archives Officer. In that post, she is working on the first ever County Historic Preservation Plan in the State of Texas, and received a significant grant in support of that effort.